Chert, Lake Michigans Left Coast, Rosoces Relics, Elizabeth Fagan

Rosie, Sandy, and Chert

In late October, 2012, Hurricane Sandy kicked up 23-foot waves on Lake Michigan off Chicago, Illinois. Afterward, thousands of sharp-cornered and beautifully caramel-colored chert shards appeared on the city's Montrose Dog Beach, a place I frequented with my German Shepherd Rosie. Here are some chert souvenirs, Hurricane Sandy waves, and a favorite snap of Rosie … Continue reading Rosie, Sandy, and Chert

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Faces of extinction, fossils on Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth Fagan dba Roscoes Relics

Faces of Extinction 3

When mass extinctions occur, as they have five times previously in Earth's history, every member of a given species expires. Not just the old, the infirm, those who have a certain vulnerability. All members of the species die, even the babies. After spotting dozens of limestone skulls of extinct creatures on Lake Michigan's Left Coast, … Continue reading Faces of Extinction 3

Faces of extinction, fossils on Lake Michigans Left Coast, Elizabeth Fagan dba Roscoes Relics

Faces of Extinction 2

Over its 4.6 billion-year history, Earth has changed many times, in many ways. Homo sapiens, the name we give ourselves, evolved a few million years ago, a tiny point in time when Earth's conditions were just so. A peculiar trait of a certain subgroup of Homo sapiens, aka humans, put itself at the center of … Continue reading Faces of Extinction 2

Faces of extinction, fossil skulls on Lake Michigans Left Coast, by Elizabeth G Fagan

Faces of Extinction 1

As children we wondered, "Why don't we see living dinosaurs?" "Because they are extinct," a parent or teacher told us. And we learned that "extinct" is an adjective meaning "of a species, family, or other larger group having no living members." (oxforddictionaries.com) We might further learn such facts as: "Species become extinct for many reasons, … Continue reading Faces of Extinction 1